The Gemasolar Solar Concentrator in Seville, Spain, contains 2,650 heliostat mirrors that focus the sun’s thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 460-foot-tall (140m) central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank, where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions every year.

37°33'38.0"N, 5°19'53.1"W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


The Waimakariri River flows for 94 miles (151 km) across the South Island of New Zealand, beginning in the Southern Alps and emptying into the Pacific Ocean. In the mid-19th century, it was briefly named the Courtenay River before reverting back to its traditional Maori name, which means “river of cold rushing water.”

43°25'02.5"S, 172°38'24.0"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Kuata is one of about 20 islands that make up the Yasawa Group, an archipelago in the Western Division of Fiji. Although Kuata is less than one square mile in size, it is a popular tourist destination where visitors enjoy lounging on its beaches, swimming, and snorkeling among friendly white-tipped reef sharks.

17°21'53.2"S, 177°08'09.2"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe



Water rushes down the main spillway of the Oroville Dam, located on the Feather River in northern California. At 770 feet high (235m), the dam is the tallest in the United States and serves mainly for water supply, hydroelectricity generation, and flood control. Amid heavy rainfall in February 2017, this spillway was significantly damaged and more than 180,000 people living downstream were evacuated.

39°32'21.2"N, 121°29'48.6"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


Beach chairs and parasols dot the shoreline of Rimini Beach, in northern Italy. Located on the Adriatic Sea, Rimini is a city of roughly 150,000 people and is one of the most famous seaside resorts in Europe. Its 9-mile-long (14.5km) sandy beach is surrounded by more than 1,000 hotels and thousands of bars, clubs and restaurants.

44°03'53.9"N, 12°35'12.6"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Clear Island Waters is a suburb on the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia. Built around artificial canals, it is a residential community that is home to roughly 4,000 people. Clear Island Waters is just a few miles west of Mermaid Beach, one of many beaches along the Gold Coast's 43-mile coastline.

28°02'40.2"S, 153°23'51.4"E

Source imagery: Nearmap


Vivid blue water fills an open-pit mine near the town of Battle Mountain in Lander County, Nevada. Founded in 1861, Lander County made its way onto the map as copper and gold mining boomed there throughout the late 19th century. Today, fewer than 6,000 people live in the 5,500-square-mile county.

40°20'17.4"N, 117°12'08.7"W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe



In honor of #MemorialDay in the United States, we’ve selected an Overview of Arlington National Cemetery outside of Washington, D.C. Since the American Civil War, the 624-acre cemetery has become the final resting place for veterans of the nation’s conflicts. The structure seen here is the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater that also contains the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

38°52′48″N, 77°04′12″W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe



Several athletic fields are positioned side-by-side in the Cadet Area of the United States Air Force Academy, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. In addition to the fields and courts shown in this Overview, the area contains a Cadet Gymnasium with indoor basketball and tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming and diving pool, a water polo pool, numerous squash and racquetball courts, two weight-training rooms, and specialized facilities for volleyball, fencing, gymnastics, boxing, and riflery.

39°00'43.2"N, 104°53'13.3"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


Pier 84 is the largest public pier and one of the highest trafficked areas in Hudson River Park. Located near 42nd Street in the heart of Manhattan, New York City, the pier has a large open area on its western end, an interactive fountain, restaurant concession and dockage for large boats.

40°45'51.0"N, 74°00'07.9"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


Jökulsarlón — or “glacial river lagoon” in English — is a large glacial lake in southeastern Iceland. Located next to the massive Vatnajökull glacier, the lagoon is formed as chunks of glacial ice melt before meeting the Atlantic Ocean. Sixty years ago, when the glacier reached all the way to the shore, Jökulsárlón did not exist; but since the 1970s it has more than quadrupled in size.

64°04'30.6"N, 16°14'36.4"W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Surfers float in the waters at Currumbin Alley, a surf break in the Gold Coast Region of Queensland, Australia. This location is ideal for novice and first-time surfers, as waves first crash into a rocky point and then roll gently inland toward Currumbin Creek. Including this site, the Gold Coast has roughly 43 miles (70 km) of coastline and some of the most popular surf breaks in the world.

28°07'31.2"S, 153°29'09.2"E

Source imagery: Nearmap


Adventuredome is a five-acre indoor amusement park on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, USA. The facility's main structure consists of more than 350,000 square feet of pink insulated glass. Inside are two roller coasters, a water ride, rock climbing wall, 18-hole miniature golf course and dozens of carnival games.

36°08'17.0"N, 115°10'02.6"W

Source imagery: Nearmap



Salar de Atacama is the largest salt flat in Chile and the third largest in the world, spanning 1,200 square miles (3,000 sq. km). It is the world’s largest and purest active source of lithium, containing more than one-quarter of the world’s lithium reserves. In this Overview, lithium-rich waters sit in a series of evaporation ponds before being extracted as lithium carbonate — a key ingredient in specific industrial salts and chemicals, and in the production of lithium metal.

23°30′0″S, 68°15′0″W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe