Several rows of storage buildings cover an area inside the Red River Army Depot in Bowie County, Texas. The 15,835-acre depot was activated in 1941 to store ammunition, and it has more than 3 million square feet of storage capacity. Today, it is primarily used as a maintenance and repair center for tactical wheeled vehicles, such as HUMVEEs.

33°26'35.2"N, 94°14'09.4"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


The Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond in Butte, Montana, is used as a dumping site for leftover materials from nearby copper mines. It covers an area of roughly 2.5 square miles (6.5 sq. km) and is contained by a 650-foot (200 m) tall earthen dam — one of the largest of its kind in the United States. To help offset the acidity of mine waste, lime rock is added to create a non-acidic tailings slurry.

46°02'37.3"N, 112°30'23.2"W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Piers 88 and 90 make up the Manhattan Cruise Terminal, a gateway for ocean-going passenger ships in the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood of New York City. Both piers are 1,100 feet (340 m) long and 400 feet (120 m) apart, and together they handle more than 1 million passengers per year.

40°46'06.9"N, 73°59'50.5"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


Spectacular, terraced rice paddies cover the mountainsides of Yuanyang County, China. Cultivated by the Hani people for the last 1300 years, the slope of the terraces varies from 15 to 75 degrees with some having as many as 3,000 steps. Approximately 1.5 square miles of paddies are seen here surrounding the small village of Tuguozhai.

23°05'55.3"N, 103°01'22.6"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


South Boston — more popularly known as “Southie” — is a densely populated neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. It was once a predominately working class Irish Catholic community, but has recently become a popular neighborhood for young professionals and families. South Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade is the second-largest parade in the United States, attracting between 600,000 and 1 million viewers every year.

42°20'09.8"N, 71°01'50.6"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


"Desert Breath" is a double-spiral work of land art found in the Egyptian desert, near the city of Hurghada. Created in March 1997 by a team of three Greek women artists, the work covers an area of about 1 million square feet (100,000 square meters). One spiral consists of 89 protruding cones, and the other spiral is made up of 89 depressed cones. A large pool of water used to occupy the center of the piece, but it has since evaporated.

27°22'49.6"N, 33°37'56.6"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Hverfjall is a tephra cone, or tuff ring, volcano located near the eastern shore of Lake Myvatn in northern Iceland. It erupted in 2500 BP, leaving behind a massive crater more than half a mile (1 km) in diameter. Hverfjall is just 1,300 feet (396 m) high, allowing tourists and hikers to scale its slopes and walk along the crater’s rim.

65°36'19.3"N, 16°52'21.1"W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Disassembled airplanes sit in storage at the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona. These planes are among more than 4,400 retired American military and government aircraft being stored and preserved on-site by the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group. Covering more than four square miles (10.5 km sq.), this facility is the largest of its kind in the world.

32°08'57.1"N, 110°49'58.1"W

Source imagery: Nearmap


Check out this Overview of the Stelvio Pass in northern Italy. With an elevation of 9,045 feet (2,757 m) above sea level, it is the highest paved roadway in the Eastern Alps. Only accessible in the summer months, the road and its 75 hairpin turns are sometimes scaled during the famous Giro d’Italia cycling race.

46°31'49.3"N, 10°27'31.4"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Several offshore oil rigs sit atop the waters of the Yangtze River Delta in eastern China. As of 2015, China is the second largest oil-consuming country in the world, behind the United States. Its people use slightly more than 12 million barrels of oil per day — or 13% of the world total.

31°47'04.6"N, 121°04'32.3"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


To celebrate today as World Oceans Day, check out this aerial image of fluorescing coral reefs off the coast of New Caledonia — a French island in the South Pacific. This still frame from the documentary "Chasing Coral" depicts a rare and beautiful, yet tragic phenomenon that certain reefs experience before death, in response to excess sun exposure and elevated ocean temperatures. Reefs like this one are disappearing in mass coral bleaching events around the world. In fact, as of 2016, more than half of Earth’s coral reefs have been lost. However, there are steps you can take to give corals a voice and protect our oceans — to find out more, visit @chasingcoral on Instagram and click the link in their bio.

21°43'48.7"S, 165°32'05.0"E

Source imagery: Netflix & Chasing Coral


Saint-Malo is a historic port city in northwestern France, located along the English Channel. It traces its origins to a monastic settlement founded early in the sixth century. During World War II, Saint-Malo was almost completely destroyed when the Allies mistook it for an Axis Power stronghold and shelled it heavily. It took 12 years to rebuild.

48°38'54.7"N, 2°01'33.6"W

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe


Frankfurt International Airport is the busiest airport in Germany and the fourth-busiest in Europe, handling 65 million passengers every year. We’re excited to announce that our founder Benjamin Grant will present at the annual Future Day conference tomorrow in Frankfurt. His talk, “The Overview Effect: Earth and Civilization in the Macroscope," will focus on what we can learn from looking at our civilization from outer space and the impact these fascinating patterns have on our planet.

50°02'26.9"N, 8°34'11.4"E

Source imagery: DigitalGlobe